Early Intervention
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June 19, 2023

What is behavioral therapy?

As a parent, it can be challenging to determine whether your child is exhibiting normal behavior or if there are underlying issues that require professional intervention.

author
Jen Wirt

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As a parent, it can be challenging to determine whether your child is exhibiting normal behavior or if there are underlying issues that require professional intervention. It's not uncommon for children to act out or have emotional outbursts, but when these behaviors become persistent and disruptive, it may be time to consider behavioral therapy.

Behavioral therapy is a form of treatment that aims to help individuals change their behavior patterns by identifying and addressing underlying psychological or emotional issues. It's often used to treat a range of behavioral and emotional disorders, including ADHD, anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior disorders.

So how do you know if your child needs behavioral therapy? Here are some signs to look out for:
  1. Persistent behavioral problems: If your child's behavior problems have been ongoing for a significant period, despite your best efforts to address them, it may be time to consider seeking professional help.
  2. Difficulty with emotional regulation: If your child struggles to control their emotions and has frequent emotional outbursts, such as tantrums or meltdowns, it may be a sign of underlying emotional or behavioral issues.
  3. Strained relationships: If your child has difficulty making and maintaining friendships or has ongoing conflicts with family members, it may be a sign of underlying emotional or behavioral issues that require intervention.
  4. Academic or social problems: If your child is struggling academically or having difficulty socializing with peers, it may be a sign of underlying emotional or behavioral issues.
  5. Trauma: If your child has experienced a traumatic event, such as abuse or neglect, they may benefit from behavioral therapy to help them process their feelings and emotions.

If you have noticed any of these signs in your child, it may be time to consider seeking behavioral therapy. A behavioral therapist can work with your child to identify underlying issues and develop strategies to manage their behavior and emotions more effectively.

It's important to note that seeking behavioral therapy does not mean that you or your child have failed in any way. Rather, it's a proactive step towards ensuring your child has the tools and support they need to navigate life's challenges.

If you are concerned about your child's behavior, it's important to seek professional help sooner rather than later. Book a consult with a Care Concierge to discuss if your child might be a fit for behavioral therapy.

Find effective support for developmental delays, quickly.

Self-pay or insurance
In-person and at-home appointments
No waitlist
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